Tagged: Religion

Royal Funerals and Saints’ Topography in Merovingian Paris

This case study focuses on the question of how Paris acquired metropolitan significance as early as the 6th and 7th centuries through the presence of rulers and important saints, although the city did not historically occupy a prominent position among the cities of Gaul and was hardly larger than an unfortified suburb of Rome or Constantinople in the Merovingian period. In these two centuries, a close topographical and symbolic connection of residence, royal burial and veneration of saints emerged, which is constitutive for the dynamic development of Paris throughout the Middle Ages…

Sufi Sites as Oases of Resonance: Jamal Malik on “Architectural Resonance”

Prof emeritus Jamal Malik commented on the notion of “architectural resonance” in Muslim cultural history, during the book launch of Architektonische Resonanz. Das Mausoleum des indischen Sufi-Meisters Shah Vajihudin Alvi by Sara Keller. Amongst other things, he noted how a Sufi shrine vibrantly interacts with its surrounding, transforming the Sufi convent into a Resonance oasis.

City Branding: UrbRel panel at DHT 2023

Susanne Rau, Martin Christ and Sara Keller are convening a panel at this year’s Historikertag which will take place from 19 – 22 September 2023 in Leipzig. The speakers include current and former fellows of the “Religion and Urbanity” research group as well as established reseachers in the field of urban history.

Architecture can induce Resonance – Hartmut Rosa on Sara Keller’s new book

Architecture can induce resonance, but the effect remains unpredictable: here’s what we learned from the discussion between Hartmut Rosa and Sara Keller at the occasion of the Sara Keller’s book launch of Architektonische Resonanz. Das Mausoleum des indischen Sufi-Meisters Shah Vajihudin Alvi published with Schnell & Steiner…

Upcoming: CoMOR exhibition in Leipzig

We are happy to announce the opening of the COMOR exhibition in Leipzig. The exhibition will be open to the public from 1 September until 15 October 2023 at the Altes Rathaus in Leipzig. The COMOR project – short for “Configutations of European Fairs. Merchants, Objects. Routes (1350-1600) – took up the history of European fairs from the perspective of “market integrations”.

Water as an Urban Technology in Medieval India – An Introduction by Sara Keller

Podcast of a lecture by Sara Keller in which she examined the question of the wide-ranging effects of global mobility and exchange on Indian societies and cities. The audio was recorded at the lecture series on “Global Exchanges”, organised by Elisa Iori and Mateusz Fafinski.

Gewinner*innen im Schul-Wettbewerb „Stadt und Religion“

Die Kollegforschungsgruppe „Religion und Urbanität“ (FOR 2779) an der Universität Erfurt hat im vergangenen Jahr einen Wettbewerb ins Leben gerufen mit dem Ziel, die Begeisterung für die Geisteswissenschaften zu stärken. Schülerinnen und Schüler sollten ermuntert werden, aus der Perspektive unterschiedlicher Fächer, sich ihre Stadt in ihren Wechselbeziehungen zu den darin gelebten und sie beeinflussenden Religionen zu erschließen…

CfP: “Making inner urban boundaries” (EAUH 2024, Panel M6)

Sara Keller and Mateusz Fafinski, who jointly run the boundary formation focus group at “Religion and Urbanity”, are organising a panel at the European Association for Urban History 2024 conference in Ostrava, Czech Republic. Titled “Making inner urban boundaries”, the panel covers boundary making and the city; religion as producer of imagined and lived boundaries. The call for papers is now open.

Urban Monasticism Then and Now

Harry O. Maier discusses Mateusz Fafinski and Jakob Riemenscheider’s book, Monasticism and the City in Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. The book provides readers with a comprehensive exploration of ancient monastic and urban sites and their inhabitants, akin to a Lonely Planet travel guide. The authors examine monasticism from five aspects: as a genre, within and as cities, with respect to monks and nuns in urban settings, in terms of monastic learning, and as a phenomenon in Afroeurasia.

Gifts of Gratitude: Votive Objects in Rome and Thuringia

Votive objects, be it votive offerings, sacred dedications or ex voto, are gifts to the gods made by humans, set up in a sacred place for religious purpose. They are a feature of ancient and modern societies alike and are attested in diverse contexts and settings, sharing though a common scope: by setting up votive objects, the individuals seek to enter in communication with the gods.

Call for Applications: Fellowships 2024/25

The “Religion and Urbanity” research group invites applications for fellowships in the period of 1 October 2024 to 30 September 2025. Fellowships are granted for a period of 3 to 6 months, beginning usually in March/April or September/October. The deadline is 1 October 2023.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search