Tagged: Early Modern Europe

Some highlights from our blog

Since 2018 we have been publishing articles, reviews, reports and personal reflections on a variety of topics. In most cases they are tied in one way or an other to one of our research areas: South Asia, especially India and Pakistan, the Mediterranean from Antiquity until today, and Europe, especially in the Medieval and Early Modern period. We have picked some of our favourite entried by fellows and core group members of the Religion and Urbanity group in Erfurt.

Animals in/and the City (City Walk 12)

On the 17th of April, we went on our twelfth city walk, which revolved around animals in the city and the animal turn. At three stops in the city of Erfurt we discussed different aspects of how animals are recognisable in the mutual formation of religion and urbanity. Frédéric Vandenberghe, Jörg Rüpke, Aileen Becker, and Heinrich Lang gave short presentations at the Natural History Museum on the Animal Turn in general and animals adapting to urban lifestyles; the St. Crucis Church on animals in biblical stories and displaying them in religious architecture, and finally at the Krämerbrücke (merchants bridge) on animals as resources in urban life.

Panel Report: City Branding: Urbanity and the Construction of City Images in Europe and South Asia

On h-soz-kult, you can now read the panel report by our fellow Heinrich Lang on the “Religion and Urbanity” panel at the 2023 Deutscher Historikertag in Leipzig. the panel “City Branding: Urbanity and the Construction of City Images in Europe and South Asia” was convened by Martin Christ, Sara Keller and Susanne Rau.

Water as a symbol of Jewish birth – The Mikvah in Erfurt

A post by our students on the Mikvah in Erfurt. Written sources on the mikvah ion Erfurt date back to the middle of the 13th century. They show that the Jewish community had to pay taxes for the bath and the land, first to the bishop, later to the city of Erfurt. From the medieval tax lists we learn that the area around the Mikvah was densely populated.

Religious Ambivalences: Podcasts I

Over the course of the upcoming weeks, we will publish recordings of the introductory comments by participants of the 2023 “Religious Ambivalences” conference, organised by Elisa Iori and Jörg Rüpke in November 2023 in Erfurt.

Jewish Heritage (11th City Walk)

At the beginning of the 2023/24 winter semester, we organised our eleventh city walk, which was dedicated to the topic of “Jewish Heritage”. The occasion was the recent designation of Erfurt’s Jewish-Medieval heritage as a UNESCO World Heritage Site on 17 September 2023.

Upcoming: CoMOR exhibition in Leipzig

We are happy to announce the opening of the COMOR exhibition in Leipzig. The exhibition will be open to the public from 1 September until 15 October 2023 at the Altes Rathaus in Leipzig. The COMOR project – short for “Configutations of European Fairs. Merchants, Objects. Routes (1350-1600) – took up the history of European fairs from the perspective of “market integrations”.

Gifts of Gratitude: Votive Objects in Rome and Thuringia

Votive objects, be it votive offerings, sacred dedications or ex voto, are gifts to the gods made by humans, set up in a sacred place for religious purpose. They are a feature of ancient and modern societies alike and are attested in diverse contexts and settings, sharing though a common scope: by setting up votive objects, the individuals seek to enter in communication with the gods.

Urban Ressources (City Walk 10)

At the beginning of the summer term we started with our 10th City Walk which was dedicated to the topic of urban ressources. Three stops in the Old Town of Erfurt gave us the opportunity to  discuss different aspects of the subject: commercialism and different interpretations of poverty in past and present, in religious and more urban environments with the visit of the Second Hand Shop at the Johannesturm in Erfurt, monasticism and the ambivalence of wealth and poverty, production and contemplation at the Augustinian monastery, and, finally, the Collegium Maius and the St Michaelis church as two significant urban institutions of the Christian university life…

UrbRel Workshop “Urbanity & the formation of religious groups”

How has an ‘urban way of life’ influenced the genesis of different religious and confessional groups? This June, UrbRel postdoc Martin Christ is convening a workshop setting out from this question. The working hypothesis of the workshop is that by considering the mutual formation of religion and urbanity, we can also gain new insights into the phenomenon of religious group formation(s) and find new ways to understand how, when and why, groups formed. The workshop will take place in June in Erfurt.

Vergangene koloniale Größe – Das Überseemuseum und die Stadt Bremen im 19. Jahrhundert und heute

Im öffentlichen Diskurs ist das Thema Kolonialismus derzeit sehr präsent. Oft geht es hierbei um unrechtmäßig angeeignetes Kulturgut. Dass hinter der Aneignung von Objekten viel mehr steckt, zeigt Mirjam Wien in ihrem Beitrag. Darin nimmt sie die Narrative des Überseemuseums Bremen damals und heute unter die Lupe.

Martin Christ receives 2022 Ecclesiastical History Society Book Award           

Martin Christ has received the 2022 Ecclesiastical History Society Book Award for first monograph. The award was bestowed on Christ’s “Biographies of a Reformation: Religious Change and Confessional Coexistence in Upper Lusatia, 1520-1635”, published with Oxford University Press in 2021. Its the third book award for Christ, who is a Junior Fellow with the UrbRel group.

Introducing the UrbRel glossary

In January 2022, the UrbRel group was successfully evaluted by the German Research Foundation (DFG). As a result, we will continue to work for a second funding phase. Until 2026, We will further develop and apply the UrbRel research programme, exploring the mutual formation of religion and urbanity as a fruitful perspective for the history of religion and urban history. The UrbRel glossary recapitulates reflections and theoretical tools from our discussions of the past years.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search